Louisville’s new CROWN Act prohibits discrimination against unwanted hairstyling and touching

Discrimination against someone because of their hairstyle is now prohibited in Louisville. Mayor Greg Fischer enacted the municipal version of the CROWN Act on Thursday. This is an amendment to the city’s anti-discrimination ordinance. The “CROWN” part of the CROWN Act stands for “Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair“. The ordinance now makes it illegal to discriminate on the basis of natural hair and hairstyles, including natural texture and color. During the signing ceremony, justice group Young Prodigy performed. Fischer said he hoped the CROWN Act would serve as an example for Louisville to be an inclusive society. “This is important because black people, historically, have too often been forced to divest from their cultural identity by conforming to white beauty standards,” Fischer said. “One of the things that I hope this will do is educate our community, especially white members of our community, about the connection between hair and identity that has long been part of black culture. The Louisville ordinance also protects people from unwanted touching, including touching hair. “It was high time we understood that hair and hair texture are a distinguishing factor associated with race and that blankets and adornments are often associated with cultural norms as well,” said City Councilor Keisha Dorsey. “I am proud of this community’s unabashed pursuit for justice, freedom, fairness and excellence.” In Kentucky, there is no statewide ban on hair discrimination. Fischer’s signing comes just weeks after the order was approved by the Metropolitan Council. Some board members, when approving the order, said black hairstyles were “nearly four times more likely to be seen as unprofessional, with black women more likely to be fired from work to because of hair prejudice, “the mayor’s office said in a statement. Declaration. Similar laws or ordinances have been passed across the country. Click here to learn more about the new ordinance.

Discrimination against someone because of their hairstyle is now prohibited in Louisville.

On Thursday, Mayor Greg Fischer enacted the municipal version of the CROWN Act. It’s an amendment to the city’s anti-discrimination ordinance.

The “CROWN” part of the CROWN Act stands for “Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair”. The ordinance now makes it illegal to discriminate on the basis of natural hair and hairstyles, including natural texture and color.

At the signing ceremony, justice group Young Prodigy performed.

Fischer said he hoped the CROWN Act would serve as an example for Louisville to be an inclusive society.

“This is important because black people, historically, have too often been forced to divest from their cultural identity by conforming to white beauty standards,” Fischer said. “One of the things I hope this will do is educate our community, especially white members of our community, about the connection between hair and identity that has long been part of black culture.”

The Louisville ordinance also protects people from unwanted contact, including contact with hair.

“It is high time we understood that hair and hair texture are a distinguishing factor associated with race and that often blankets and adornments are also associated with cultural norms,” ​​said City Councilor Keisha Dorsey. “I am proud of the unabashed pursuit of this community of justice, freedom, fairness and excellence.”

In Kentucky, there is no statewide ban on hair discrimination. Fischer’s signing comes just weeks after the order was approved by the Metropolitan Council. Some board members, when approving the order, said black hairstyles were “nearly four times more likely to be seen as unprofessional, with black women more likely to be fired from work to because of hair prejudice, “the mayor’s office said in a statement. declaration.

Similar laws or ordinances have been passed across the country.

Click here to learn more about the new ordinance.